Forbes India: 5 Signs that MOOC 2.0 is Here

N.S. Ramnath for ForbesIndia.com

A year ago, google Chairman Eric Schmidt compared the state of massive open online courses (or MOOCs, a sector that Coursera, EdX and Udacity dominate) to the first generation of iPhone. An iPhone 1.0 was revolutionary, but nowhere close to its potential. It improved by leaps and bounds leading to iPhone 5. The same is happening with MOOCs. Five signs that show it has evolved compared to a year ago:

1. Scale: From a platform for a bunch of American universities, MOOCs have turned global—signing up a range of universities from across the world. IIT Bombay also offers a course on MOOC.

2. Acceptance: A year ago, MOOCs largely offered courses that had little recognition either in universities or in job markets. That has changed. It is now possible to take proctored exams that enhance the credibility of the certificates.

3. Technology:
 The first generation MOOC courses centred around lectures that could have been delivered in a classroom, except that they were given in chunks of 8 to 15 minutes, without interaction possibilities. Khan Academy, which is not counted among MOOCs but has several of their elements, recently launched a new website that guides students on the courses based on test performances.

4. Business models: The contours of business models for online courses are getting clearer, even as there are questions on the sustainability of traditional universities.

5. Ecosystems: A range of ancillary businesses have evolved around MOOCs. Software Secure conducts proctored exams online. Prudentia, a startup, is in the process of building a platform that will help students find the right courses for them.

Read more: http://forbesindia.com/article/checkin/5-signs-that-mooc-2.0-is-here/36353/1#ixzz2iU2sQ3hl

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Early Analysis Shows MOOCs Struggle With Engagement

by Mirabel Shanny, for EducationNews.org

Although Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are fast becoming a popular option for students worldwide, the medium faces several challenges along the way to realizing its full potential. According to completion statistics, more than 90 percent of students who enroll in a MOOC drop out, as many feel isolated, disengaged or just lose interest.

MOOCs, heralded as the next great technological disruption in education, went mainstream last year with the broad popularity of Khan Academy, Coursera, edX and Udemy. Putting lecture videos and interactive coursework on the web makes it possible for top-notch universities to make education available to more students. MOOCs have already shown they can attract massive number of students. According to Geoffrey A. Fowler of The Wall Street Journal, Coursera, the largest provider of online courses, has drawn 5 million students, and nonprofit provider edX has attracted more than 1.3 million. And while the majority of students are still based in the U.S., learners come from all over the globe: Among edX’s students, 9% came from Africa and 12% from India.

– See more at: http://www.educationnews.org/online-schools/early-analysis-shows-moocs-struggle-with-engagement/#sthash.dmi1Dy4Z.dpuf

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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MOOCs: Can They Produce the Next Einstein?

by Svetlana Dotsenko, in Huffing Post College

Growing proliferation of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) is having a profound (if not fully understood) effect on education. MOOCs, compared to traditional classrooms, have impressively high enrollment, introduce more diversity into student population, and show better learning outcomes among students. MOOCs are arguably “changing higher learning forever“.

However, learning is not the sole function of education; creating knowledge, or doing research, is another responsibility of academia. While MOOCs produce armies of learners, it is unclear if they are going to inspire the next generation of scientific discovery. The effect of growing proliferation of MOOCs on creating knowledge is not yet known, nor has it been studied systematically.

Full Post Here.

Maybe they will produce the next Einstein in a place where one could never come from without this innovation in delivery mode.  Somewhere other than the world that developed the first one, a world with the very selective entry into the leading institutions in Europe.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Europe’s iversity Launches 1st MOOCs With 100k+ Students & Curriculum Of 24 Courses

by Natasha Lomas for TechCrunch on 14 October 2013

Berlin-based MOOCs startup iversity, which last year began a pivot away from online learning collaboration tools with the aim of becoming the Coursera of Europe, is launching its first clutch of free online courses today.

Back in March, iversity told TechCrunch it was hoping to attract six-digits’ worth of students at the launch of its MOOCs. And it’s managed to do so — saying initial student sign-ups have exceeded 100,000.

iversity CEO Marcus Riecke said the level of launch traction it has achieved proves the MOOCs concept can fly in continental Europe, which has lagged the U.S. in experimenting with the massive online courses model for free-to-learn higher education. In the U.S. a raft of MOOCs players have sprung up, with Coursera, Harvard- and MIT-backed edX andUdacity being among the biggest.

Full story is here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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EdX’s Anant Agarwal: Education should go from bricks and mortar to bits and bytes

Interview by Padmaparna Ghosh of The Times of India (9/13/2013)

Anant Agarwal

Anant Agarwal, president, EdX, believes the blended classroom is the future – a classroom that will benefit from a rich array of online courses and the vitality ofinterpersonal communication.

EdX, a massive open online course(MOOC) platform that offers university-level courses from professors around the world was founded by MIT and Harvard University last year. It is now in talks with Indian universities on hosting and distributing courses. He talks to TOI about the role a virtual screen can play in education.

Full interview is here.

 

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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MOOC Leader EdX Turns One: What’s Next?

Commentary by Michael Fitzgerald @ Information Week

EdX recently turned one year old. It gave itself a present: the full open-source release of its software platform.

We know what EdX officials wished for when they blew out the candles on the cake. But what do we wish for them? Like anything in its infancy, MOOCs are full of possibilities and promise, but their path is unpredictable.

I wish MOOCs had fewer problems. They can be just as flat and unengaging as a real-world lecture, maybe worse. We get dazzled by 150,000 people signing up, and forget that only 5% of them finish a class. Even the worst public schools do not suffer 95% dropout rates. That might not seem like a fair comparison; after all, communities make it harder to drop out of school. But MOOC students at least have gone through the process of registering for a class, so you would think they would want to complete it.

Full post here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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edX Adds 15 American and International Universities to Its Roster

edx logo

Massive open online course provider (MOOC) edX has expanded its base by 15 additional universities.  They now have a roster of 27 institutions in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Australia.  The platform just launched last May as a joint venture between Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  As of today, they have over 900,000 individuals using its platform.

The newly added universities are:

Source

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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