EdX New Certificate Programs Designed to Deliver Immediate Career Pathways

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EdX just announced the launch of its Professional Certificate programs, which they see as expanding their offerings in the area of access to global learners.  The offerings are by industry leaders and top universities.  These offerings are designed to be shorter than their MicroMasters programs.  Currently, there are 15 Certificate Programs from 13 providers.

Here are the current offerings:

  1. Inclusive Leadership (CatalystX)
  2. Date Science for Executives (ColumbiaX0
  3. Retail and Omnichannel Management (DartmouthX)
  4. Java and Android Foundation (HKUSTx)
  5. Public Management for Development (IDBx)
  6. Microsoft Professional Program In Data Science
  7. Merger and Acquisitions (NYIF)
  8. Project Finance and Public Private Partnerships NYIF)
  9. Risk Management (NYIF)
  10. Six Sigma and Learn: Quantitative Tools for Productivity and Quality (TUMx)
  11. Agile Development Using Ruby On Rails (US BerkleyX)
  12. Virtual Reality (VR) App Development (UC San DiegoX)
  13. Computer Science Essentials of rSoftware Development (PennX)
  14. Digital Marketing (Wharton)
  15. Front-End Web Developer (W3Cx)

The EdX announcement is here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Posted in edX

Harvard Medical School Launches First Online Certificate Program

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Harvard Medical School has announced it will launch a 4 course certificate program called “HMX Fundamentals.”  These courses will be open to the public through a brief application, although they will differ from their edX and HarvardX platform courses in that they will cost money.  One course will cost $800, two courses will cost $1,000, and all four courses will cost $1,800.

The courses will be in physiology, immunology, biochemistry, and genetics.  Upon completion, the students will receive a PDF certificate, but the courses will not count for academic credit at Harvard.

Sources

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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EdX CEO Lays Out Disruptive Vision For Higher Ed

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Anant Agarwal, CEO of edX, was interviewed on Public Radios Here & Now.  The text of the interview is available here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Chronicle: Harvard U. Will Offer Exclusive MOOCs to Alumni

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Harvard is to start offering exclusive access to its grads to seven of its MOOCs.

Full post here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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MOOCs: Too Much Hype, or Not Enough?

Dr. Jeff Borden, Pearson for Wired.com

Earlier this month, I went to an eLearning conference in Saudi Arabia and again, the topic of Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs, came up. But, they were discussed very differently at this conference than I have described in past posts. For the past few years, I have noted that MOOCs are the easiest way to get attendance at eLearning conference presentations. About 25-35% of conference sessions talked about the  – mostly from a, “How You Can Do It” perspective although there were always a few asking if we should, “Believe The Hype?”

But at this conference, it was stated as official — “The Hype Is Over.” This was stated emphatically by both an American keynote presenter and by the Director of eLearning for the main University in the Kingdom. They both noted that MOOCs were just simply given too much credit out of the gate and that they often took away from the real conversation of eLearning.

Obviously, the folks at Coursera or Udacity would likely disagree with this position, but what about those without a stake in the race? Are MOOCs dying or are they here to stay?

I’ve blogged a lot about MOOCs in the past. It’s been hard not to if you’re an education blogger. But I’ve noted the problems with first generation MOOCs. Not to belabor the point, but we now know that most xMOOCs (meaning those with a broadcast, top-down model vs a “cMOOC” — the ‘c’ stands for constructivistic), are taken by people outside of the U.S. They are not generally taken for the credit but for an individual “module” of content, hence the seriously low completion numbers. More often than not, they are taken by people who already hold degrees. They utilize a peer to peer evaluation methodology that has proven quite challenging (after all, how often do you find 10,000 people who can really help guide the other 90,000 on a difficult or complex topic?). And on and on.

Full article here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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MOOCs and Their Discontents

from Aljazerra.com

To say that MOOCs propagate inequality is to deny their fundamental mission and the thinking that conceived them.


Coded into the DNA of MOOCs (the unwieldy acronym for Massive Open Online Courses) is a profound sense of social, educational, and economic justice. MOOCs are courses from the world’s premier institutions of higher learning offered on a variety of platforms, the most notable of which are CourseraedX, and Udacity. They aim to bring the knowledge and expertise housed in the most selective public and private universities and deliver them to anybody around the world who has little more than a computer or tablet and a working internet connection.

They are inherently egalitarian; the fundamental principle that guides them is to universalise the availability of knowledge and human understanding from the widest possible variety of academic fields. Anant Agarwal, the president of edX,said in a recent interview, “Education is our cause. It’s really important that people around the world have access to a great education, much like the air we breathe.”

All of these points ignore the most glaring error of [Kendzior’s] article, which is to have neglected the question, what is a MOOC, and what isn’t it?

Full post here. 

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Easing Into MOOCs

Easing in” is the natural approach that those behind the cutting edge should use when approaching technology and pedagogy that is called disruptive and/or innovative. Innovators do not generally have to navigate a ship though the minefields of the bleeding edge of technology. They are guiding one possible path for the ships that follow. They have to be able to pivot as the unknown plays out. Those who follow are smart to ease in and use what works and reject or tweak what does not work.

Elizabeth Clabocchi’s full blog post is over at the Sloan eLearning Landscape blog.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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“Course Versus “Learning Experience”

Link

Virtual Chalkdust post about an Inside Higher Ed http://virtualchalkdust.com/2013/10/29/course-versus-learning-experience/

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Fortune: Why Online Education Won’t Kill Your Campus

Fortune has an article about disruption, online education, and brick-and-mortar institutions.  Anne VanderMey, argues that MOOCs have not exhibited a disruptive force in the market yet, despite Coursera scoring $43 million in funding and having over 80 institutions using its platform.  Although, they could be disruptive in the future.  Her assessment of MOOCs thus far is that they augment tradition online courses rather that replacing them.

Source.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Harvard and MIT’s Online Education Startup Has a New Way to Make Money

Robinson Meyer @ TheAtlantic.com

t’s been about a year and a half since massive open online courses (MOOCs) achieved notoriety, and the industry now has three giants: Coursera, Udacity, and EdX. Coursera and Udacity are West Coast-run, Stanford-spawned, for-profit standard-style startups.

EdX is different: It launched as an East Coast, non-profit collaboration between Harvard and MIT.

EdX, then, is more of a mystery. As a non-profit, it’s not concerned with, well, profit. But it is concerned with its own survival, so, this month, it debuted a new way of making money.

Until this fall, EdX had mimicked a tack Udacity and Coursera have taken: A “business-to-consumer” approach, in which students pay the course provider to verify their identity before they take a class on EdX.org, a kind of certification of achievement. To help get these verified learners, EdX has begun to link courses together into curriculum. (I wrote about these “XSeries” course sequences last month.)

The second push has come much more into view in October. It’s a “business-to-business” pitch—although, so far, we’ve seen it take effect in a business-to-nation way.

It has a different product for this pitch, too: “Open EdX.” Announced in September, Open EdX is the code that makes EdX.org work; it’s a platform for MOOCs.

Full article is here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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