Forbes India: 5 Signs that MOOC 2.0 is Here

N.S. Ramnath for ForbesIndia.com

A year ago, google Chairman Eric Schmidt compared the state of massive open online courses (or MOOCs, a sector that Coursera, EdX and Udacity dominate) to the first generation of iPhone. An iPhone 1.0 was revolutionary, but nowhere close to its potential. It improved by leaps and bounds leading to iPhone 5. The same is happening with MOOCs. Five signs that show it has evolved compared to a year ago:

1. Scale: From a platform for a bunch of American universities, MOOCs have turned global—signing up a range of universities from across the world. IIT Bombay also offers a course on MOOC.

2. Acceptance: A year ago, MOOCs largely offered courses that had little recognition either in universities or in job markets. That has changed. It is now possible to take proctored exams that enhance the credibility of the certificates.

3. Technology:
 The first generation MOOC courses centred around lectures that could have been delivered in a classroom, except that they were given in chunks of 8 to 15 minutes, without interaction possibilities. Khan Academy, which is not counted among MOOCs but has several of their elements, recently launched a new website that guides students on the courses based on test performances.

4. Business models: The contours of business models for online courses are getting clearer, even as there are questions on the sustainability of traditional universities.

5. Ecosystems: A range of ancillary businesses have evolved around MOOCs. Software Secure conducts proctored exams online. Prudentia, a startup, is in the process of building a platform that will help students find the right courses for them.

Read more: http://forbesindia.com/article/checkin/5-signs-that-mooc-2.0-is-here/36353/1#ixzz2iU2sQ3hl

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Early Analysis Shows MOOCs Struggle With Engagement

by Mirabel Shanny, for EducationNews.org

Although Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are fast becoming a popular option for students worldwide, the medium faces several challenges along the way to realizing its full potential. According to completion statistics, more than 90 percent of students who enroll in a MOOC drop out, as many feel isolated, disengaged or just lose interest.

MOOCs, heralded as the next great technological disruption in education, went mainstream last year with the broad popularity of Khan Academy, Coursera, edX and Udemy. Putting lecture videos and interactive coursework on the web makes it possible for top-notch universities to make education available to more students. MOOCs have already shown they can attract massive number of students. According to Geoffrey A. Fowler of The Wall Street Journal, Coursera, the largest provider of online courses, has drawn 5 million students, and nonprofit provider edX has attracted more than 1.3 million. And while the majority of students are still based in the U.S., learners come from all over the globe: Among edX’s students, 9% came from Africa and 12% from India.

– See more at: http://www.educationnews.org/online-schools/early-analysis-shows-moocs-struggle-with-engagement/#sthash.dmi1Dy4Z.dpuf

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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MOOCs: Can They Produce the Next Einstein?

by Svetlana Dotsenko, in Huffing Post College

Growing proliferation of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) is having a profound (if not fully understood) effect on education. MOOCs, compared to traditional classrooms, have impressively high enrollment, introduce more diversity into student population, and show better learning outcomes among students. MOOCs are arguably “changing higher learning forever“.

However, learning is not the sole function of education; creating knowledge, or doing research, is another responsibility of academia. While MOOCs produce armies of learners, it is unclear if they are going to inspire the next generation of scientific discovery. The effect of growing proliferation of MOOCs on creating knowledge is not yet known, nor has it been studied systematically.

Full Post Here.

Maybe they will produce the next Einstein in a place where one could never come from without this innovation in delivery mode.  Somewhere other than the world that developed the first one, a world with the very selective entry into the leading institutions in Europe.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Europe’s iversity Launches 1st MOOCs With 100k+ Students & Curriculum Of 24 Courses

by Natasha Lomas for TechCrunch on 14 October 2013

Berlin-based MOOCs startup iversity, which last year began a pivot away from online learning collaboration tools with the aim of becoming the Coursera of Europe, is launching its first clutch of free online courses today.

Back in March, iversity told TechCrunch it was hoping to attract six-digits’ worth of students at the launch of its MOOCs. And it’s managed to do so — saying initial student sign-ups have exceeded 100,000.

iversity CEO Marcus Riecke said the level of launch traction it has achieved proves the MOOCs concept can fly in continental Europe, which has lagged the U.S. in experimenting with the massive online courses model for free-to-learn higher education. In the U.S. a raft of MOOCs players have sprung up, with Coursera, Harvard- and MIT-backed edX andUdacity being among the biggest.

Full story is here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Northwestern Launches First MOOC

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Phil Ponce interviews Owen R. Youngman of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism about his MOOC that began today.  The MOOC, Understanding Journalism by Understanding Google, is the first by Northwestern in its partnership with Coursera.  The course is free (unless you want to go through Coursera’s signature route and receive a certificate) and has 41,000 students enrolled.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Wesleyan’s Secrets To Successful MOOCs

by Ellis Booker @ InformationWeek.com

At Wesleyan University, a private college in Middletown, Conn., “learning by doing” has been the approach to its first round of massive open online courses (MOOCs) with partner Coursera.

“Getting our feet wet makes us think more deeply about things,” said Jolee West, director of academic computing services and digital library projects. “We’re going to start from a different point from schools who’ve never mounted one.”

Full Post Here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Coursera Adds 10 State Universities and 1.25 Million Students

Coursera Logo

Coursera has announced it has added 1.25 million new users to its massive online online course platform through the addition of 10 state universities.  Faculty at these state universities will be able create new courses or make use of existing courses from faculty at other schools for online or blended classes.  There might also be an expansion to include dual-enrollment high school students.

The 10 universities added to the platform are:

Source

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Daphne Koller: What We’re Learning from Online Education

Daphne Koller is enticing top universities to put their most intriguing courses online for free — not just as a service, but as a way to research how people learn. With Coursera (cofounded by Andrew Ng), each keystroke, quiz, peer-to-peer discussion and self-graded assignment builds an unprecedented pool of data on how knowledge is processed.

With Coursera, Daphne Koller and co-founder Andrew Ng are bringing courses from top colleges online, free, for anyone who wants to take them. Bio:
http://www.ted.com/speakers/daphne_ko…

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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