Coursera Learning Hubs

by DegreeofFreedom

As they describe in this press release, these new Learning Hubs “will offer people around the world physical spaces where they can access the Internet to take a Coursera course, while learning alongside peers in an interactive, facilitated setting.”  Initial partners for the program include the US Department of State, and a variety of international universities and private learning organizations.

Apparently, the program grew out of discussions with State Department personnel interested in finding an inexpensive and effective way to deliver educational programs via US embassies.  And recognizing that anywhere/anywhen online learning doesn’t have to contradict the notion of people working together in a shared space, Coursera decided to programitize the idea around three delivery models for blended learning.

These include:

  • Discussion based – Where a facilitator would manage conversation around a week’s course lectures and encourage students to continue the conversation on the Coursera discussion boards
  • Tutoring based – Where the facilitator would both lead discussion and support students on their weekly assignments
  • Project based – Where the facilitator would work with the class to come up with a set of projects students can work on independently or together to supplement regular course work

Full post here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Georgia Tech’s New Partnership to Offer $7,000 Online Master’s Degree In Computer Science

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Georgia Institute of Technology has partnered with AT&T and MOOC start-up Udacity to offer a completely online Master’s degree in Computer Science.  That degree will cost only $7,000, rather than the $40,000 it would cost non-Gerogia residents.  It hopes to offer the degree to 10,000 students over three years and to only hire a handful of staff to facilitate the project.  Udacity staffers–called mentors–will be used to fill the gap.

The full post is here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Who Applied to Georgia Tech’s New Master’s Program?

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Well a lot of people did. In just 20 days applications were nearly 1,000 above what they receive in a full year.

The Georgia Institute of Technology has in 20 days received almost 1,000 more applications for its low-cost online master’s degree than it does in a year for its residential program, according to data released by the university.

The 2,359 applicants are also demographically different from the students who normally apply for the residential program, which is popular among international students. About 80 of applicants for the online program come from the United States, compared to about 20 percent for the residential program. The master’s degree program in computer science is a partnership between Georgia Tech, AT&T and massive open online course provider Udacity. The degree costs only $7,000, and university officials have promised it will be as rigorous as the residential program, which can cost up to $40,000 a year.

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2013/10/31/who-applied-georgia-techs-new-masters-program#ixzz2jK3ajz6m
Inside Higher Ed

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Easing Into MOOCs

Easing in” is the natural approach that those behind the cutting edge should use when approaching technology and pedagogy that is called disruptive and/or innovative. Innovators do not generally have to navigate a ship though the minefields of the bleeding edge of technology. They are guiding one possible path for the ships that follow. They have to be able to pivot as the unknown plays out. Those who follow are smart to ease in and use what works and reject or tweak what does not work.

Elizabeth Clabocchi’s full blog post is over at the Sloan eLearning Landscape blog.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Advances For “Traditional” Online Learning Programs Courtesy of MOOCs

Moving away from some of the typical questions about MOOC, if they are disruptive or innovative, if there is a workable business model, what are the completion rates, etc., Shari Smith and Karen Vignare cut through to five things that are advances for “Traditional” online learning programs.  To this I might add that they are a great source of reusable learning objects for the traditional classroom and for traditional online.

Included among the five are:

  • Scalable LMS
  • Focus on the Learner
  • Creates Content Opportunities
  • The 21st Century Audit
  • Learn From All

The full blog post is over at the Sloan eLearning Landscape blog.

 

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Forbes: Students Issue Report Card on MOOCs

by Susan Galer @ Forbes.com

Debates on the pros and cons of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) often overlook how these online sessions fundamentally change the dynamic of learning. I’ve been writing about the emergence of MOOCs in businesses like SAPas a flexible, fast option to teach developers about the latest technologies. While online surveys have yielded a significant amount of student feedback, I decided it was time to hear first-hand from some developers who have participated in recent SAP MOOCs, including Introduction Software Development on SAP HANAand Introduction to Mobile Software Development for the Enterprise.

Brenton O’Callaghan, a United Kingdom-based consultant at Bluefin who attended the introductory SAP HANA MOOC, was struck by the richness of the shared experience that spilled over to other communities.

“People were taking the conversation to the SAP Community Network (SCN), posing course scenarios and asking questions that I knew were from the MOOC. On Twitter, they were sharing feedback about the modules, and the instructors were posting course updates. I ended up encountering people in different communities, and realizing they had been in the course too. I thought that was good because it means that anybody doing the course on their own in the future would be able to search for this information and find it in the SAP developer community.”

 

Source

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Fortune: Why Online Education Won’t Kill Your Campus

Fortune has an article about disruption, online education, and brick-and-mortar institutions.  Anne VanderMey, argues that MOOCs have not exhibited a disruptive force in the market yet, despite Coursera scoring $43 million in funding and having over 80 institutions using its platform.  Although, they could be disruptive in the future.  Her assessment of MOOCs thus far is that they augment tradition online courses rather that replacing them.

Source.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Harvard and MIT’s Online Education Startup Has a New Way to Make Money

Robinson Meyer @ TheAtlantic.com

t’s been about a year and a half since massive open online courses (MOOCs) achieved notoriety, and the industry now has three giants: Coursera, Udacity, and EdX. Coursera and Udacity are West Coast-run, Stanford-spawned, for-profit standard-style startups.

EdX is different: It launched as an East Coast, non-profit collaboration between Harvard and MIT.

EdX, then, is more of a mystery. As a non-profit, it’s not concerned with, well, profit. But it is concerned with its own survival, so, this month, it debuted a new way of making money.

Until this fall, EdX had mimicked a tack Udacity and Coursera have taken: A “business-to-consumer” approach, in which students pay the course provider to verify their identity before they take a class on EdX.org, a kind of certification of achievement. To help get these verified learners, EdX has begun to link courses together into curriculum. (I wrote about these “XSeries” course sequences last month.)

The second push has come much more into view in October. It’s a “business-to-business” pitch—although, so far, we’ve seen it take effect in a business-to-nation way.

It has a different product for this pitch, too: “Open EdX.” Announced in September, Open EdX is the code that makes EdX.org work; it’s a platform for MOOCs.

Full article is here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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MOOCs: Can They Produce the Next Einstein?

by Svetlana Dotsenko, in Huffing Post College

Growing proliferation of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) is having a profound (if not fully understood) effect on education. MOOCs, compared to traditional classrooms, have impressively high enrollment, introduce more diversity into student population, and show better learning outcomes among students. MOOCs are arguably “changing higher learning forever“.

However, learning is not the sole function of education; creating knowledge, or doing research, is another responsibility of academia. While MOOCs produce armies of learners, it is unclear if they are going to inspire the next generation of scientific discovery. The effect of growing proliferation of MOOCs on creating knowledge is not yet known, nor has it been studied systematically.

Full Post Here.

Maybe they will produce the next Einstein in a place where one could never come from without this innovation in delivery mode.  Somewhere other than the world that developed the first one, a world with the very selective entry into the leading institutions in Europe.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Europe’s iversity Launches 1st MOOCs With 100k+ Students & Curriculum Of 24 Courses

by Natasha Lomas for TechCrunch on 14 October 2013

Berlin-based MOOCs startup iversity, which last year began a pivot away from online learning collaboration tools with the aim of becoming the Coursera of Europe, is launching its first clutch of free online courses today.

Back in March, iversity told TechCrunch it was hoping to attract six-digits’ worth of students at the launch of its MOOCs. And it’s managed to do so — saying initial student sign-ups have exceeded 100,000.

iversity CEO Marcus Riecke said the level of launch traction it has achieved proves the MOOCs concept can fly in continental Europe, which has lagged the U.S. in experimenting with the massive online courses model for free-to-learn higher education. In the U.S. a raft of MOOCs players have sprung up, with Coursera, Harvard- and MIT-backed edX andUdacity being among the biggest.

Full story is here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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