Campus Technology: The Rise of MOOCs

Campus Technology MOOC CoverCampus Technology has released the August edition of its digital publication.  The issue  focuses on MOOCs.  Massively Open Online Courses (or MOOCs as they are affectionately known) have been one of the hottest topics in higher edition for a couple of years now.  As the major players in the field–Coursera, edX, and Udacity–jockey for partnerships with major universities and for a viable business model, academia is taking time to re-evaluate MOOCs.

Recently one university has placed a hold on its partnership, a MOOC was cancelled soon after launch, and much has been made of the low completion rate for most of these courses.  On the other had, Georgia Tech has launched an accredited massively open online Masters of Science degree in computer science and there is movement forward on awarding competency based credits, both of which could blow open the whole business model debate.  This special edition looks at many of these issues.

Included in the issue are the following articles:

  • MOOCs: Good or Bad
  • The MOOC Business Plan
  • Blended MOOCs: The Best of Both Worlds
  • Assessment Tools for MOOCs
  • How to Convert a Class Into a MOOC
  • Building a Sense of Community in MOOCs
  • CMOOCs: Putting Collaboration First

The full post and and ebook are available here.

Online version available here.

PDF version available here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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In Shadow of MOOCs, Open Education Makes Progress

by David F. Carr @ Information Week

Freely downloadable textbooks and other open educational resources (OERs) are starting to have a practical impact, saving college students millions of dollars even as advocates struggle to distinguish the OER movement from the rise of the massive open online courses (MOOCs).

By the standards of OER, the MOOCs distributed by the commercial operations Coursera and Udacity as well as the non-profit edX are only partly open. I’ll come back to this distinction later. When I moderated a panel discussion on OER last week at the Distance Teaching and Learning Conference held at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, MOOCs were a side issue, but an important one.

Full post here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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Qualtrics and Instructure Partner to Reveal Top Motivations for MOOC Students

by Instructure

Instructure, an education technology provider, and Qualtrics, an insight technology provider, today announced the results of a new research study on the motivations of massive open online course (MOOC) participants. The primary motivators for people to both enroll in and complete MOOCs are the course topic and quality of the learning experience, according to a Qualtrics survey of 1,834 students in Instructure’s Canvas Network MOOC index.

The study found that course topic is the main motivator for enrollment among 35 percent of MOOC participants, followed by personal or professional development (24 percent) and the fact that MOOCs are free (16 percent). Among those who didn’t complete, 29 percent said the main reason was the learning experience didn’t match their expectations, and the same number said they were too busy to finish.

Full report is here: http://www.instructure.com/press-releases/qualtrics-and-instructure-reveal-mooc-students-top-motivations

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.
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